The Other Rookie Star of the World Series? Globe Life Field


ARLINGTON, Texas — Clayton Kershaw was eight years outdated when his hometown Texas Rangers reached the playoffs for the first time. It was the excellent age to be immersed in the recreation, and now as the 32-year-old ace of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Kershaw nonetheless wears a reminder on his again: His No. 22 is a tribute to Will Clark, the former Texas first baseman.

Kershaw noticed a number of Rangers video games yearly at the outdated ballpark throughout East Randol Mill Road from its successor, the imposing Globe Life Field, the place he has received Games 1 and 5 of this yr’s World Series in opposition to the Tampa Bay Rays. The restricted crowd in attendance was largely pro-Dodgers, giving Kershaw a distinctively 2020 spin on his memorable October.

“This year’s been weird, special, different in a lot of ways, to get to be here,” he mentioned late Sunday night time, as two of his younger kids romped round the Zoom room, mugging for the cameras at his digital information convention. “I don’t need to say that it’s understanding the approach I wished it to, as a result of being at Dodger Stadium can be superior, too.

“But to get to have household and pals right here, to get to have as packed a home as it may be and mainly look like it’s all Dodger followers could be very particular as effectively.”

The Dodgers have taken fairly effectively to Globe Life Field, which has rivaled the Rays’ Randy Arozarena as the star rookie of the baseball postseason. The Dodgers — who were scheduled to face the Rays in Game 6 on Tuesday with a chance to clinch their first championship since 1988 — swept the San Diego Padres in their division series here then took a seven-game National League Championship Series from the Atlanta Braves, overcoming a three-games-to-one deficit.

Counting those games, and a three-game series with the Rangers at the end of August, the Dodgers played 19 times here before Game 6, with 13 victories. They have made one of the league’s more spacious fields seem cozy, bashing 30 homers in those 19 games — or three more than the Rangers managed in their 30 home games in the regular season.

“It’s definitely not small, I’ll tell you that,” said the Dodgers’ Justin Turner, who has three postseason homers here. “We have hit some home runs, but you definitely have to hit it for it to get out of here. We have played a lot of games here, and we are pretty familiar with it. It’s no Dodger Stadium, it’s not our home park, but so far we’ve done a pretty good job.”

Globe Life Field has been an ideal setting for much of baseball’s first mostly neutral-site postseason. The Rangers were never a threat to be here (they went 22-38 in the regular season), and with a retractable roof, weather has not been much of a factor. While it was windy at times in the N.L.C.S., the roof was closed on a chilly night in Game 3 of the World Series and again to keep out rain in Game 5.

The 8,700-square-foot video board above right field has played to the designated home team — Los Angeles for Games 1, 2 and 6; Tampa Bay for the others — and the players get their usual walk-up and warm-up music. Vin Scully gave his trademark greeting before Game 1 (“It’s Time For Dodger Baseball!”), and when the Rays won a wild Game 4, the scoreboard beamed the “Entourage” scene with Johnny Drama shouting “Victory!” from his knees by a canyon. (It’s a Rays thing.)

“There’s something about this place,” Rays starter Charlie Morton said. “It’s very robust. It’s big — it feels big — they have the big screen above the field. It feels like it’s hanging right on top of you. They’ve got the World Series logo in gold, the banners you’d expect to see.”

Rob Matwick, the Rangers’ executive vice president of business operations, said the club replaced the old park, which opened in 1994, for three main reasons: to escape the unrelenting summer heat; to host events year-round; and, naturally, to generate more revenue. When Rangers fans are allowed in to cheer for their team, they could help provide a robust home-field advantage.

As for the old stadium — initially known as The Ballpark In Arlington — it has been reconfigured and is now home to North Texas S.C., the reserve team for F.C. Dallas of Major League Soccer, after holding XFL games in the spring. Last week the park hosted two high school football games and its first collegiate game, between Abilene Christian and Stephen F. Austin. The Rangers’ old office space now serves as the corporate headquarters for the Six Flags Entertainment Company.

But for some faraway baseball fans, it will always be a sacred spot: The San Francisco Giants clinched their first World Series championship there in 2010, ending a 56-year drought that stretched to the franchise’s days in New York.

The Giants’ old rival from Brooklyn has won five titles since moving to Los Angeles, but the latest pursuit has been decades in the making. The Dodgers were hoping to start a new decade by turning a different Texas ballpark into their own hallowed ground.



Source link Nytimes.com

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